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Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

Comparative adjectives express a higher degree of a particular quality, whereas superlative adjectives express the highest degree. In order to create comparative adjectives in English, we add "-er" to the end of shorter adjectives (such as "cheaper") or add “more” in front of longer adjectives (“more expensive”). In German, -er is added to all adjectives regardless of how many syllables they have. Mehr is never used for this purpose. 

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„Nichts leichter als das", antwortete Frederick.

"Nothing easier than that!" answered Frederick.

Caption 4, Piggeldy und Frederick - Arm

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Aber was noch viel wichtiger ist als der Saft zum Frühstück, ist natürlich der Kaffee.

But what's far more important for breakfast than juice is, of course, coffee.

Caption 14, Jenny beim Frühstück - Teil 1

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Superlative adjectives in English either have "-est" at the end or are preceded by the adjective “most” ("cheapest," "the most expensive"). In German, the suffix -ste or -sten is used, depending on the declension. Take note: Putting meist in front of an adjective will give it a fully different meaning (similar to "mostly"). 

 

Das ist das schönste Gefühl auf der Welt.

That is the most beautiful feeling in the world.

Caption 66, Kinotipp - Kokowääh

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Am einfachsten ist es bei Papier und Pappe.

It is easiest with paper and cardboard.

Caption 11, Eva erklärt - Mülltrennung

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Jeden Tag trug die Prinzessin die schönsten Gewänder und den teuersten Schmuck

Every day the Princess wore the most beautiful garments and the most expensive jewelry

Captions 7-8, Märchen - Sagenhaft - König Drosselbart

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Further Learning
When you learn a new adjective on Yabla German, take a moment to learn its comparative and superlative forms. Keep in mind that there are irregular forms where a slight spelling change (such as an umlaut) is required. Take a look at this table for some examples.

Trödel and Other Worthless Junk

I was riding on the Berlin U-Bahn (subway) recently and noticed an advertisement from a very well-known auction website on the wall of the subway car that read Trödel mehr als der M41. This use of the verb trödeln had me puzzled, though I knew it was related to the noun der Trödelmarkt:

 

Also, hier gibt es auch viele Secondhand- und Trödelläden.

So, there are also many secondhand and junk shops here.

Caption 26, Jonathan Johnson - Kreuzberg, Berlin

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The noun der Trödelladen has a similar meaning to der Trödelmarkt, just as der Laden has a similar meaning to der Markt. I knew that trödeln means "to sell things at a junk shop or flea market," but what does this have to do with the Berlin M41 bus line? It turns out the slang and most common usage of trödeln is "to go slowly" or "to waste time," but also "to move slowly without a fixed destination," thus "to wander," "to amble," or "to meander." The auction website ad translates approximately to "Wander around (alternately: go shopping for secondhand goods) more than the M41 bus," so it's a play on words on the fact that the M41 is a long, meandering bus line and that you can use the auction site to shop for good deals.

 

The noun der Trödel, which is also short for der Trödelmarkt, has taken on the slang meaning of "useless, worthless things, especially clothing, furniture and household articles," just as you expect to see in a junk shop or flea market, the latter of which translates directly to German as der Flohmarkt, by the way.

 

Junk shops and flea markets are numerous in Berlin and range from places filled literally to the ceiling with useless, broken junk to something much closer to fine antique shops. Those people who are too poor to shop anywhere but at Trödelläden and Flohmärkte can take comfort in the wise words of Piggeldy and Frederick: 

 

„Schätze kann man nicht essen, bloß verkaufen.

"You can't eat treasures, [you can] only sell [them].

Caption 13, Piggeldy und Frederick - Arm

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„Reich ist, wer was verkaufen kann."

"Rich are those who have something to sell."

Caption 16, Piggeldy und Frederick - Arm

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Further Learning
Go to the German Duden dictionary and see the various meanings of der Trödelmarkt, der Trödel, and trödeln, and then see if you can guess the meanings of this list of words relating related to trödeln. Then you can go to Yabla German to find other real-world examples of the words related to shopping in German.

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